A Child’s Palate

Friends and family often comment on what good eaters our boys – especially Tiny – are. Not in terms of how much they eat, rather, what they eat.

I put it down to the variety of foods we offer them on a daily basis; the variety we’ve offered right from starting solids. We opted for feeding our boys by baby-led weaning, meaning they’ve always eaten what we eat, or at least tasted what we eat.

Pesto BagelNeither are keen on tomatoes or capsicum, but enjoy raw mushrooms and grapefruit. Both love paté and pesto, and Tiny is rather partial to salmon (smoked or fresh) and blue cheese. He must be the only three-year-old who doesn’t like tomato ketchup, and he’s only just started to eat pizza. Seriously, what kid doesn’t like sauce and pizza??!

Toddler eats CherriesMy in-laws were here over the weekend, and they were amused at his food choices. We went to a café for lunch one day, and on the way, he piped up, “I hope this café has sushi!”. Once inside, he chose brioche french toast over fish and chips; the in-laws were impressed, but Tall and I were unfazed, because this is a common occurrence.

IMG_2137So far, Pickle is proving to be as adventurous as Tiny – perhaps more so. He loves crunching on cucumber and celery, and will happily try anything he is offered. He might not like everything, but as far as I’m concerned, it’s the trying it that’s important.

Cherries & AvocadoHe didn’t like peas the first time he tried them, but over the weekend, downed a bowl of them. Same with broccoli and raisins; we live by the “rule of 10”, offering things at least 10 times before ruling them out.

They do both enjoy “normal” kid foods too, especially of the “treat” variety. When Pickle was sick last month, he stopped eating all together…except for potato chips. We have an unwritten rule in this house: if we’re prepared to eat it in front of them, we have to be prepared to share.

A few weeks ago, I conducted a small experiment. I heated a can of tomato soup (sideline: I’m considering writing to Campbell’s to tell them their recipe for beef and tomato shepherd’s pie should be called cottage pie, seeing it’s made with beef, not lamb…) and took it to the table, asking Tiny if he’d like to have some red soup. He would. He came to the table and ate every last drop of that soup. “I don’t like tomato soup,” he told me. “What about red soup?” I asked nonchalantly, trying to keep a straight face. “Oh yes!” he exclaimed. “I do like red soup!”

**If you want to vote for Tall, Short, Tiny & a Pickle for the 2013 Munch “Best Kids Food Blog” award, voting is open until 29 October.**

Munch Award~~~~~~~~~
Fun with Food

Please copy and paste the button below and include it in your foodie post!
By clicking on the link below, you’ll be taken to an external page, where you can enter your link and see who else is linking up. Please take the time to visit them, too!


Powered by Linky Tools

Click here to enter your link and view this Linky Tools list…

Advertisements

Savoury Pinwheel Scones

One of my latest baking obsessions has been savoury pinwheel scones. I can’t get enough of them, and if I don’t make any myself, I seek them out at cafés and, if I’m desperate, the supermarket.

For the scone dough, I like using Alison Holst’s basic scone recipe; as for the fillings…well, my view is that whatever you’d put on a pizza could probably be rolled up in pinwheel scone.

Rolling Pin Savoury Pinwheel Scones Savoury Pinwheel Scones Savoury Pinwheel SconesSavoury Pinwheel Scones – makes 6-12 (depending on how greedy you’re feeling)

2c self-raising flour
1/4t salt
2t sugar
25g butter, melted
1/2c milk
1/4 – 1/2c water

grated cheese
relish or chutney
shaved ham, cooked bacon or a combination of lightly-cooked vegetables

Preheat oven to 220degC.

Sift flour, salt and sugar into a large bowl. Add the melted butter, milk and 1/4c water.

Mix with a knife until blended, adding enough extra water to make a soft dough.

Turn the dough out onto a lightly-floured bench; roll out to a rectangle approximately 20 x 40cm.

Spread relish or chutney over the dough, leaving around 1cm clear along one of the long edges. Sprinkle over cheese, and top with meat or vegetables.

Dampen the clear edge with a little water, then roll the dough to form a long sausage, pressing the dampened dough lightly at the end.

Cut the roll into pieces as thick as you like; place on a greased or lined baking tray, allowing room for spreading.

Bake for 15-20 minutes, until lightly browned.

Serve warm. Best slathered in sufficient butter or margarine to ooze out through the little gaps in the roll.

~~~~~~~~~
Scone dough recipe: Alison Holst’s Good Food

~~~~~~~~~
Fun with Food

Please copy and paste the button below and include it in your foodie post!
By clicking on the link below, you’ll be taken to an external page, where you can enter your link and see who else is linking up. Please take the time to visit them, too!


Powered by Linky Tools

Click here to enter your link and view this Linky Tools list…

Cake for a Cat

image  On Sunday afternoon, Tiny asked if we could bake a cake.

“Absolutely!” I replied. I love cake.

“For Cat’s birthday!” he called from halfway up the stairs.

The crocheted soft cat I brought back from Valparaiso when I was pregnant with him. The cat that sits on his bed before being tossed during the night. Oh.

Any excuse for cake, right?

I wanted to bake a cake that would be easy for him to help me with, so chose the One-Egg Chocolate Cake recipe I’ve been using since I was 11-years-old.

image

Except…Tiny chose to play with his toys and leave me to do all the hard work. Sigh.

When the cake had cooled and been iced with a frosting-that-almost-failed, he did help me decorate it with (a few too many) sprinkles, and nine of the candy-coloured Trade Aid candles I was sent by lovely Miriam.

Cat, Teddy & Jelly

We sat at the dining table with Cat, Teddy, Jelly and Pickle. We sang “Happy Birthday” over and over, and blew out the candles at least eight times. Pickle thought it was hilarious; Tiny thought it was the best party ever.

image

The cake was pretty tasty too.

~~~~~~~~~
Fun with Food

Please copy and paste the button below and include it in your foodie post!
By clicking on the link below, you’ll be taken to an external page, where you can enter your link and see who else is linking up. Please take the time to visit them, too!


Powered by Linky Tools

Click here to enter your link and view this Linky Tools list…

~~~~~~~~~
AND linking in with Miriam for BMWB 🙂

BMWB

Potato Soup with Chorizo & Parsley

I know, I know – another soup recipe…..but we do love us some soup in this house. This was another that my smallest boys devoured; the biggest wasn’t sold until I told him there was spicy chorizo hiding in there, and then he was happy.

This has got to be one of the simplest soups on the planet; by itself, the potato soup would be pretty boring, but with the chunks of crispy chorizo and fresh, grassy parsley, it is delicious.

The original recipe suggests a greater quantity of milk than I used, but adding the suggested 250ml would have created a very thin soup, which I didn’t want. The original also suggests using chorizo slices, which are similar in size and thickness to salami slices, but I thought that rustic chunks would be nicer. I like textural contrasts with food.

Potato Soup with Chorizo & ParsleyPotato Soup with Chorizo & Parsley – serves 4

40g butter
450g potatoes, peeled and chopped
1 onion, diced
salt & freshly ground black pepper
900ml chicken stock
50-100ml milk
chorizo sausage
1T olive oil
large handful fresh flat leaf parsley, roughly chopped

Melt the butter in a large soup pan. Add the potatoes and onion; season. Cover the pan and let the vegetables sweat over a low heat for around 10 minutes.

Bring the stock to a boil in a separate pot; when the vegetables are tender, add the hot stock and cook a further 15 minutes or until the vegetables are soft.

Purée the soup in a blender or using a stick blitzer. Season to taste and reheat; add sufficient milk until you reach your desired consistency.

Just before serving, cut the chorizo into chunky slices. Heat the oil in a fry pan and fry the chorizo until crispy.

To serve, drop chunks of chorizo into each bowl or soup and top with fresh parsley; drizzle with the paprika-flavoured oil that rendered out of the chorizo.

~~~~~~~~~
Original recipe: Darina Allen for Market Kitchen Cookbook

~~~~~~~~~
Fun with Food

Please copy and paste the button below and include it in your foodie post!
By clicking on the link below, you’ll be taken to an external page, where you can enter your link and see who else is linking up. Please take the time to visit them, too!


Powered by Linky Tools

Click here to enter your link and view this Linky Tools list…

Lamb Kofta Curry

On Saturday night, we had friends over for a potluck Indian Feast (the same friends we had the Eastern Mediterrnean dinner with a few weeks ago). There were homemade samosas, mango lassi, and four different types of curry. I made a chicken tikka masala, and paratha breads; we ate and drank until our bellies were bursting and our plates were clear.

IMG_3647IMG_3649When I sat down to plan this week’s meals, I had to think of a way to use up the fresh coriander and chillies I’d bought for the tikka masala. This recipe uses both in the kofta, and calls for a coriander garnish – perfect!

As he did the last time I made this (how cute does he look here?!?!), Tiny scoffed the lot, and Pickle ate a little too; I served it with a basic cucumber raita in case it was too hot for Tiny, but reducing the amount of chilli powder meant the spice kick was very slight.

Lamb Kofta Curry – serves 4

Kofta
675g lamb mince
1 fresh green chilli, deseeded and finely chopped
1 clove garlic, crushed
2.5cm piece fresh ginger, finely grated
1/2t garam masala
1/4t salt
3T fresh coriander, finely chopped

Sauce
2T rice bran oil
1/2t cumin seeds
1 onion, finely chopped
1 clove garlic, crushed
2.5cm piece fresh ginger, finely grated
1t ground cumin
1t ground coriander
1/2t salt
1/2t chilli powder (I use about 1/8t if I’m making this for the kidlets to eat too)
2T tomato paste
400g can chopped tomatoes (I prefer the crushed and sieved variety)
fresh coriander leaves, to garnish
basmati rice, to serve

Combine the kofta ingredients in a large bowl; mix well with your hands until everything is bound together (you could use a food processor to do this). Shape into 16-20 even-sized meatballs; cover with cling film and chill for 10 minutes.

IMG_3644Meanwhile, heat the oil in a large pan and fry the cumin seeds until they begin to splutter.

Add onion, garlic and ginger, and fry for five minutes. Add the spices and fry for 30 seconds; add the tomato paste and stir before adding the tinned tomatoes. Simmer for five minutes.

IMG_3653Add the meatballs. Bring to the boil; stir, cover and simmer for 25 minutes, until the meatballs are cooked through. Uncover, and cook a further five minutes.

Serve over cooked basmati rice and garnish with fresh coriander leaves.

IMG_3658~~~~~~~~~
Fun with Food

Please copy and paste the button below and include it in your foodie post!
By clicking on the link below, you’ll be taken to an external page, where you can enter your link and see who else is linking up. Please take the time to visit them, too!

Powered by Linky Tools

Click here to enter your link and view this Linky Tools list…

Cauliflower and Bacon Soup

Cauliflower doesn’t feature highly on my favourite vegetables list. I’ll eat it, but I don’t usually cook with it; I’d choose broccoli over cauliflower any day.

IMG_3618 However, when my husband pointed out this recipe in the Sunday paper, I was happy to give it a try. I love that he is more than happy to have soup for dinner…as long as there is enough bread to go with it. His opinion is that there should be enough bread to dunk into your soup that you can reach the bottom of the bowl without needing to use a spoon.

IMG_3625

This soup couldn’t be easier to make, and it is packed with flavour – don’t let the insipid colour put you off. Next time, I think I’ll reserve some bacon and fry until crispy, then add to the pureed soup; the crunch would be a nice contrast to the velvety soup. It’s a good Cheap-As Tuesday dinner, but is equally good a few days later.

(If you prefer a vegetarian soup, check out this recipe for Cauliflower and Blue Cheese Soup – YUM!)

IMG_3626Cauliflower and Bacon Soup – serves 4-6

2T butter or olive oil
4 shallots, chopped (I used 3 shallots plus half a red onion)
1/2 c chopped bacon
900g cauliflower florets (approx. one large cauliflower)
100ml dry white wine
1.5L beef stock
250ml water
Salt and pepper

Heat butter or oil in a large soup pot. Add shallots and bacon, and sauté over a low heat until the shallots are soft (around 10 minutes).

Add the cauliflower and wine; let the wine bubble for 30 seconds, then add the stock and water. Bring to the boil, then simmer for about 30 minutes, until the cauliflower is soft.

Purée in a blender or with a stick mixer; season to taste and serve with fresh bread (preferably hot from the oven, dripping with lashings of butter or margarine!).

IMG_3620~~~~~~~~~
Original recipe: Sunday Star Times (some time in July 2013)

~~~~~~~~~
Fun with Food
Please copy and paste the button below and include it in your foodie post!
By clicking on the link below, you’ll be taken to an external page, where you can enter your link and see who else is linking up. Please take the time to visit them, too!


Powered by Linky Tools

Click here to enter your link and view this Linky Tools list…

A Herb Garden

I can’t wait to get my hands dirty in our new vegetable garden.

IMG_3557There are all my favourite herbs already flourishing

IMG_3559but I’d like to add in some dill and coriander

IMG_3561once the weeds are under control.

IMG_3562There are some little yellow silverbeets growing there

IMG_3558and even though I don’t like silverbeet

IMG_3566I think it looks so pretty that it can stay there for now.

IMG_3564Fresh herbs make me happy.

It’s often the simple things.

~~~~~~~~~
Fun with Food
Please copy and paste the button below and include it in your foodie post!
By clicking on the link below, you’ll be taken to an external page, where you can enter your link and see who else is linking up. Please take the time to visit them, too!


Powered by Linky Tools

Click here to enter your link and view this Linky Tools list…